October 14, 2013
#dayoff #cliffhangin’

#dayoff #cliffhangin’

11:06am  |   URL: http://tmblr.co/ZibsZyxd-L3l
Filed under: cliffhangin dayoff 
October 13, 2013
"We’ve had three big ideas at Amazon that we’ve stuck with for 18 years, and they’re the reason we’re successful: Put the customer first. Invent. And be patient,” he said. “If you replace ‘customer’ with ‘reader,’ that approach, that point of view, can be successful at The Post, too."

Jeff Bezos and the Washington Post - Technovia (via deathbeard)

The third point is probably the most important, but always the hardest, ain’t it?

9:01am  |   URL: http://tmblr.co/ZibsZyxXdARl
  
Filed under: biz amazon work 
October 11, 2013
theparisreview:

“I try to leave out the parts that people skip.” 
Elmore Leonard, born on this day in 1925.

theparisreview:

“I try to leave out the parts that people skip.” 

Elmore Leonard, born on this day in 1925.

October 6, 2013

ninaperlman:

The Uses of Metaphor (by Rob Giampietro)

(via jesuisperdu)

October 3, 2013
pheezy:


PPPPP

This is how I feel right now. Thanks, client conference call.

pheezy:


PPPPP

This is how I feel right now.

Thanks, client conference call.

September 23, 2013
Minnie Driver, Mini Driver

spytap:

How has no one at whoever handles Mini’s advertising done a campaign where Minnie Driver goes on wacky automotive hijinks with a Mini Cooper? You can call it “Minnie Driver, Mini Driver.”

I think she should also have a puppet sidekick: “Mini Minnie Driver” who has her own “Mini Minnie Driver driver” to drive her around - you know, since she’s a puppet and all, and puppets shouldn’t drive.

The ads just sort of write themselves…

Yes to all of it.

(via prophecyboy)

September 23, 2013
A giant head, with no body. Good thing that kind of thing isn’t terrifying or anything to children. 
"His name is Raider Rusher, a costumed youth ambassador straight out of an animated cartoon series called "NFL Rush Zone," co-produced by the NFL and Nickelodeon. While each team has its own character in the series, the Raiders are the first team in the NFL to bring one of the show’s characters to life.”

A giant head, with no body. Good thing that kind of thing isn’t terrifying or anything to children. 

"His name is Raider Rusher, a costumed youth ambassador straight out of an animated cartoon series called "NFL Rush Zone," co-produced by the NFL and Nickelodeon. While each team has its own character in the series, the Raiders are the first team in the NFL to bring one of the show’s characters to life.”

6:39pm  |   URL: http://tmblr.co/ZibsZyvrLrB8
Filed under: nfl sports raiders mascots why 
September 14, 2013
Yes, the fact that Voyager 1 has left the solar system is a great story, but what I love most of all is that a 77 year old retired computer programmer saved the day. In a world that increasingly prizes youth and novelty above all, it’s nice to know that there can be grey hair under a hero’s white hat.

" As the solar system’s edge grew tantalizingly close, NASA asked the Voyager scientists to increase the amount of data collection. The problem: the 8-track data recorders from 1977 were not exactly bursting with extra space. Could Ms. Dodd even find anyone who specialized in that piece of technology and could coax it to record more?

“These younger engineers can write a lot of sloppy code, and it doesn’t matter, but here, with very limited capacity, you have to be extremely precise and have a real strategy,” she said.

She was able to find her man: Lawrence J. Zottarelli, 77, a retired NASA engineer. He came up with a solution. But would it work?

Mr. Zottarelli waited at Voyager mission control one afternoon last month to find out. The first of the newly programmed data dumps was set to come down. Ms. Dodd, Dr. Stone and Mr. Zottarelli watched two old Sun Microsystems computers like children watching for a chick to peck through an egg. “Nine, eight, seven,” Dr. Stone counted down.

“Everything’s fine,” said Mr. Zottarelli, flashing a thumbs up. “You’re on your own now.”

The relief was written all over Ms. Dodd’s face. “It’s not easy flying an old spacecraft,” she said.

Her eyes moved to Dr. Stone, who was peering at a computer through his trifocals.

“There are lots of old missions,” he responded with a sly smile. “But not many are doing exciting new things.” “

Yes, the fact that Voyager 1 has left the solar system is a great story, but what I love most of all is that a 77 year old retired computer programmer saved the day. In a world that increasingly prizes youth and novelty above all, it’s nice to know that there can be grey hair under a hero’s white hat.

" As the solar system’s edge grew tantalizingly close, NASA asked the Voyager scientists to increase the amount of data collection. The problem: the 8-track data recorders from 1977 were not exactly bursting with extra space. Could Ms. Dodd even find anyone who specialized in that piece of technology and could coax it to record more?

“These younger engineers can write a lot of sloppy code, and it doesn’t matter, but here, with very limited capacity, you have to be extremely precise and have a real strategy,” she said.

She was able to find her man: Lawrence J. Zottarelli, 77, a retired NASA engineer. He came up with a solution. But would it work?

Mr. Zottarelli waited at Voyager mission control one afternoon last month to find out. The first of the newly programmed data dumps was set to come down. Ms. Dodd, Dr. Stone and Mr. Zottarelli watched two old Sun Microsystems computers like children watching for a chick to peck through an egg. “Nine, eight, seven,” Dr. Stone counted down.

“Everything’s fine,” said Mr. Zottarelli, flashing a thumbs up. “You’re on your own now.”

The relief was written all over Ms. Dodd’s face. “It’s not easy flying an old spacecraft,” she said.

Her eyes moved to Dr. Stone, who was peering at a computer through his trifocals.

“There are lots of old missions,” he responded with a sly smile. “But not many are doing exciting new things.” “

12:54pm  |   URL: http://tmblr.co/ZibsZyv0mOJM
  
Filed under: nasa voyager 1 space 
September 13, 2013
scinerds:


Amazonian Butterflies Drink Turtle Tears

The sight of butterflies flocking onto the heads of yellow-spotted river turtles in the western Amazon rain forest is not uncommon, at least if one is able to sneak up on the skittish reptiles. But the reason why butterflies congregate onto the turtles may be stranger than you think: to drink their tears.
Image: Butterflies in the Amazon have been observed flocking onto the heads of turtles to drink their tears, which provide the animals with a vital source of the mineral sodium. Credit: Jeff Cremer
The butterflies are likely attracted to the turtles’ tears because the liquid drops contain salt, specifically sodium, an important mineral that is scant in the western Amazon, said Phil Torres, a scientist who does much of his research at the Tambopata Research Center in Peru and is associated with Rice University.
Unlike butterflies, turtles get plenty of sodium through their largely carnivorous diet. Meat contains significant levels of the salt, Torres told LiveScience. But herbivores sometimes struggle to get enough sodium and other minerals, he added. “They end up needing this extra mineral source,” he said.



This is like a children’s book come to life, right?

scinerds:

Amazonian Butterflies Drink Turtle Tears

The sight of butterflies flocking onto the heads of yellow-spotted river turtles in the western Amazon rain forest is not uncommon, at least if one is able to sneak up on the skittish reptiles. But the reason why butterflies congregate onto the turtles may be stranger than you think: to drink their tears.

Image: Butterflies in the Amazon have been observed flocking onto the heads of turtles to drink their tears, which provide the animals with a vital source of the mineral sodium. Credit: Jeff Cremer

The butterflies are likely attracted to the turtles’ tears because the liquid drops contain salt, specifically sodium, an important mineral that is scant in the western Amazon, said Phil Torres, a scientist who does much of his research at the Tambopata Research Center in Peru and is associated with Rice University.

Unlike butterflies, turtles get plenty of sodium through their largely carnivorous diet. Meat contains significant levels of the salt, Torres told LiveScience. But herbivores sometimes struggle to get enough sodium and other minerals, he added. “They end up needing this extra mineral source,” he said.

This is like a children’s book come to life, right?

(via kenyatta)

September 12, 2013
"You will always feel like your work isn’t good enough. As a salve, or simply as a way to stay sane, be in the world. Ride the train. Listen to strangers. Occasionally, if you’re brave, speak to them. Walk in the city you live. Pay attention. Don’t bother with taking notes, or buying fancy notepads. Try to remember as much as you can. Have just enough confidence in yourself to not be an asshole. Then, get up and go to work and try again."

Advice on writing from Stuart Nedler, author of Wise Men – yet another addition to this ongoing archive of writers’ advice on writing.

Pair with a whole new way to pay attention

(via explore-blog)

Yes. Yes. Yes.

(Source: , via slavin)