January 6, 2014
davidaedwards:

A map of 19th Century shipping routes and nothing else

Nautical trade routes stretch like so many lengths of string in this arresting visualization of intercontinental commerce in the 1800s. The map that emerges highlights not only several continents and their busiest ports, but the various trade winds that cycle through the lower reaches of Earth’s atm…

http://io9.com/a-map-of-19th-century-shipping-routes-and-nothing-else-1495012998?utm_campaign=socialflow_io9_facebook&utm_source=io9_facebook&utm_medium=socialflow

Smoke…

davidaedwards:

A map of 19th Century shipping routes and nothing else

Nautical trade routes stretch like so many lengths of string in this arresting visualization of intercontinental commerce in the 1800s. The map that emerges highlights not only several continents and their busiest ports, but the various trade winds that cycle through the lower reaches of Earth’s atm…

http://io9.com/a-map-of-19th-century-shipping-routes-and-nothing-else-1495012998?utm_campaign=socialflow_io9_facebook&utm_source=io9_facebook&utm_medium=socialflow

Smoke…

(via notational)

January 6, 2014
explore-blog:

On this first Monday of the new year, How to Avoid Work – a 1949 guide to doing what you love

"Hate" is a strong word, but…

explore-blog:

On this first Monday of the new year, How to Avoid Work – a 1949 guide to doing what you love

"Hate" is a strong word, but…

(Source: , via explore-blog)

January 1, 2014
"Free resolution for those that need one fast: Bring the reflection, excitement, and anticipation of New Year’s Eve to every night, and treat every morning with the optimism, renewal and sense of possibility most of us reserve for New Year’s Day. I mean, every day is technically the start of a new year — it just depends on how you look at it. (That’s also an argument for champagne 24/7 in case you need one.)"

December 31, 2013
theatlantic:

How The Twilight Zone Predicted Our Paranoid Present

More than half a century after it first aired, The Twilight Zone still has one of the most recognizable opening themes in television history: Doo-doo-doo-doo, doo-doo-doo-doo, doo-doo-doo-doo. Incidentally, composer Marius Constant dashed off the 30-second theme song in a single afternoon, according to The New York Times—but that melody has endured in our popular imagination just as the program has. Though its original run spanned five seasons between 1959 and 1964, generations of new viewers have since discovered The Twilight Zone, its longevity at least partly buoyed by an annual marathon broadcast each New Year’s dating back to 1994. The Syfy network will continue the tradition for a 19th time this week, airing more than 80 episodes in 48 hours starting the morning of Dec. 31 at 8 a.m.
Read more. [Image: CBS]


Not to mention giving us the line, “IT’S A COOKBOOK!”

theatlantic:

How The Twilight Zone Predicted Our Paranoid Present

More than half a century after it first aired, The Twilight Zone still has one of the most recognizable opening themes in television history: Doo-doo-doo-doo, doo-doo-doo-doo, doo-doo-doo-doo. Incidentally, composer Marius Constant dashed off the 30-second theme song in a single afternoon, according to The New York Times—but that melody has endured in our popular imagination just as the program has. Though its original run spanned five seasons between 1959 and 1964, generations of new viewers have since discovered The Twilight Zone, its longevity at least partly buoyed by an annual marathon broadcast each New Year’s dating back to 1994. The Syfy network will continue the tradition for a 19th time this week, airing more than 80 episodes in 48 hours starting the morning of Dec. 31 at 8 a.m.

Read more. [Image: CBS]

Not to mention giving us the line, “IT’S A COOKBOOK!”

(via jesuisperdu)

December 29, 2013
"Although there’s always been a crime drama subgenre of loveable, capering crooks as central characters, pitted against brutal/bungling cops, the hierarchy of the mainstream crime drama, in terms of who knows what, has historically been quite strict. At the top of the knowledge tree there’s the writer, who knows everything. Next come the criminals, who are one step ahead of the police. Next comes the hero-detective, lonely at the front of the pursuit. Trailing in last place are the rest of the police and us, the viewers: everyone else always knows more about what’s going on than we do. The Wire upended that hierarchy. By giving equal time and a great deal of sympathy to the drug dealers, alongside the police, we knew not only what the two groups were doing, but what they knew and didn’t know about what the other side was doing. One season started with our being shown a drug gang stashing bodies behind stapled hardboard in derelict houses; no detective found out about it till 12 episodes later. We, the viewers, are promoted up the hierarchy of knowledge to a place just below the writer – a position identical to that of the audience in classical tragedy and comedy. We’re not watching to find out whodunnit or why. We’re watching to find out how they’re going to deal with it when they discover what we already know."

James Meek reviews ‘Breaking Bad’ produced by Vince Gilligan · LRB 3 January 2013 (via slavin)

The last sentence sums it all up — and also happens to be the definition of great comedy, too.

(via slavin)

December 28, 2013
gurafiku:

Gurafiku Review: Most Popular on Gurafiku in April, 2013.
Japanese Poster: Magaru My Girl / Maboroshi My Boy. Keisuke Maekawa. 2012

gurafiku:

Gurafiku Review: Most Popular on Gurafiku in April, 2013.

Japanese Poster: Magaru My Girl / Maboroshi My Boy. Keisuke Maekawa. 2012

December 28, 2013
kenyatta:

poetsandwriters:

From “(Mis)Adventures in Poetry” by D.A. Powell in The Writer’s Notebook: Craft Essays from Tin House. Tin House Books: 2009.
 


Applicable to a lot of things.

Good advice not just for poets.

kenyatta:

poetsandwriters:

From “(Mis)Adventures in Poetry” by D.A. Powell in The Writer’s Notebook: Craft Essays from Tin House. Tin House Books: 2009.

 

Applicable to a lot of things.

Good advice not just for poets.

December 18, 2013

slavin:

Supporting Write A House (indiegogo)

Write A House is Detroit-based literary organization that uses the wide range of available home stock in Detroit to build up support for the literary arts in the city.

Detroit visual arts & Detroit musical arts have gotten a ton of attention over the years, but we believe this is a city that could really use some more writers.

And we believe writers should have nice homes. Write A House invests money in vocational training to renovate vacant homes and then awards the homes to emerging writers. It’s like a writer’s in residence program, but the writers get to keep the homes, forever. It’s pretty much that simple.

(Source: youtube.com)

December 16, 2013
Two of my favorite things. Offal and my dad’s old cookbooks.

Two of my favorite things. Offal and my dad’s old cookbooks.

December 13, 2013

nevver:

School’s out

Why did I never think of this?

4:38pm  |   URL: http://tmblr.co/ZibsZy1170lYU
  
Filed under: art school